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How to Follow Up After an Interview
October 25, 2016


By Kristine Penning, AgCareers.com

You made it through the interview—whew! Now the hardest part is waiting. But hold on—before you just sit back and wait to hear from an employer, you need to courteously send a follow-up or thank you note.

Thanking an Employer

If you don’t thank an employer for their time, you likely won’t hear back from them at all. It’s common courtesy to send a thank you letting them know that you appreciated their consideration of you as a potential candidate.  And it’s important to get this thank you to them FAST.

Here are some things to include that will impress your interviewer:

  • Your appreciation (first and foremost)

  • What impressed you about the organization you are applying to work for

  • How to contact you should your interviewer have any further questions

Handwritten Notes

Handwritten thank you notes are fun for employers to receive and add a personal touch rather than an easy-to-send email. Target typically has $1 thank you notes in their dollar bin. Otherwise you can find nice ones there and at Wal-Mart near their card sections.

A Thank You Email

Emails are less desirable and personal than a handwritten note, but better than nothing. And often the best option if you want to get that thank you to your interviewer in a timely fashion. I sent a thank you note via email when I applied to work with AgCareers.com as soon as I got home.

Array of items

If you haven’t heard back…

If a substantial amount of time has passed from when you interviewed and you still haven’t heard anything from the employer, it is okay to check in and see how things are going.

But there’s a tactful way to do so. Send an email or even give them a phone call beginning by asking if they have any further questions for you or need information on references. This quietly says, “Did I get the job?” without making you look pesky and impatient. Another unique idea is to send a news article relating to the industry you are applying to work for or something that was brought up during the interview and say something like, “I read this article today and it reminded me of our discussion during our interview, so I thought I would pass it along for you to read as well.”